Wage Subsidy and Special Conditions

For the purposes of calculating Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA), wage subsidy and special conditions are support you get on the job that may result in your getting more pay than the actual value of the services you perform. Wage subsidy refers to support you get from your employer; special conditions are generally given to you by someone other than your employer, for example a vocational rehabilitation agency.

Social Security looks at wage subsidy and special conditions when they make an SGA decision. They only use earnings that represent the real value of the work you perform to decide if your work is at the SGA level. If Social Security decides that wage subsidy or special conditions exist, you can earn more while continuing to get your benefits.

Wage subsidy or special conditions may exist if:

  • You get more supervision than other workers doing the same or a similar job for the same pay
  • You have fewer or simpler tasks to complete than other workers doing the same job for the same pay, or
  • You have a job coach or mentor who helps you perform some of your work

Note that Social Security uses wage subsidy and special conditions rules when they are deciding if you have earned Substantial Gainful Activity after your SSDI Trial Work Period is over. Social Security does not use these rules during your Trial Work Period or in any Trial Work month.